Terminology - C

  • CELL: A single, small cavity surrounded partially or completely by walls.
  • CELLULAR MATERIAL: A generic term for materials containing many cells (either open, closed, or both) dispersed throughout the mass.
  • CELLULAR RUBBERS: Cellular rubber is a cellular material made of rubber. Cellular rubber products all contain cells or small hollow receptacles. The cells may either be open and inter-connecting, or closed and not interconnecting.
  • CHLOROPRENE: Commonly referred to as Neoprene, chloroprene was one of the first synthetic materials. It is common for chloroprene to be blended with other polymers and referred to as commercial grade neoprene. The physical properties of a "commercial" neoprene vary widely, yet offer excellent and cost effective options.
  • CLOSED CELL: A cell totally enclosed by its walls and hence not interconnecting with other cells.
  • COLD VULCANIZED SPLICE: A more cost effective method where bonding is completed with a room temperature adhesive. Sufficient to use where splicing is a function to aide in installation or when longevity is not required.
  • COLLAPSE: Inadvertent densification of a cellular material during its manufacture resulting from breakdown of its cellular structure.
  • COMPOUND: An intimate admixture of a polymer with all the ingredients necessary for the finished article.
  • COMPRESSION SET: The residual deformation after removal of the force which has subjected the specimen to compression.
  • CONCENTRICITY: The relationship of two or more circles or circular surfaces having a common center.
  • CONDITIONING OF PARTS: Storing parts at a pre-determined temperature and time typically before taking measurements of dimensions for inspection.
  • CORED CELLULAR MATERIAL: Cellular material containing a multiplicity of holes — usually, but not necessarily cylindrical in shape — molded or cut into the material in some pattern that is normally perpendicular to the largest surface, and extends part or all the way through the piece.
  • CRACKING: A sharp break or fissure in the surface, generally due to excessive strain.
  • CRAZING: A surface effect on rubber articles characterized by innumerable, minute cracks.
  • CURE: The act of vulcanization.
  • CUT: The distance between cuts or parallel faces of articles produced by repetitive slicing or cutting of long pre-shaped rods or tubes — such as lathe cut washers.